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Standardized Tournaments And Ratings System

AUTHENTICATED KICKBOXING RECORD

As of 1993 December 04

Revised: 2012 September 30



BENNY “The Jet” URQUIDEZ

 

Born: 20 June 1952

Citizenship: United States

Birthplace: Tarzana, CA, USA

Height: 5 foot 5½ inches (1.68 meters)

Martial Arts Background: Kenpo-Shotokan karate
            judo

               boxing

 

KICKBOXING RECORD

 

Total

Wins

Losses

Draws

No Contests

Knockouts

Kick-Knockouts

Undocumented Bouts *1

9

9

0

0

0

9

 4

Experimental Rules

24

24

0

0

0

21

6

International Rules

20

19

0

0

1

13

3

Full-Contact Rules

11

9

0

1

1

5

1

STAR SUMMARY RECORD

64

61

0

1

2

48

14

Asian Rules

2

0

1

1

0

0

0

Thai Rules

1

1

0

0

0

1

0

SUMMARY TOTALS

67

62

1

2

2

49

14

 

 

 

RING STATISTICS

 

Championship

Career

Qualifying Bouts

36

67

Rounds-Fought Average

4.7

4.0

Knockout Average

63.9%

73.1%

Kick-Knockout Average

13.9%

20.9%

 

 

ORIGIN OF NICKNAME

Dubbed “The Jet” by Darnel Garcia while he encouraged Benny from the sidelines to throw jump kicks during a match at a 1972 karate tournament held at Madison Square Garden in New York City. A year later, the Elton John song “Benny and the Jets” was released and soon rose to number-one on the music charts. The nickname Benny “The Jet” stuck ever after.

 

 

SPECIALTY FIGHTING SKILLS

Spin back kick, left hook, right cross: machinegun kick-punch combinations punctuated by jump kicks on the outside, bunches of punches on the inside, and train engine pacing that begins gradually in the early rounds but gains speed, power and pace as the bout progresses.

 

 

KICKBOXING TITLES

WKA Super Welterweight World Champion (154 lbs / 69.9 kg – International)

STAR Undisputed Welterweight World Champion (147 lbs / 66.8 kg – Without Clinch-Fighting)

WKA Welterweight World Champion (147 lbs / 66.8 kg – International)

MTBN Welterweight World Champion (66 kg / 145.5 lbs – International)

STAR Undisputed Super Lightweight World Champion (140 lbs / 63.9 kg – Without Clinch-Fighting)

WKA Super Lightweight World Champion (142 lbs / 64.5 kg – Full-Contact, Experimental, International)

PKA Lightweight World Champion (145 lbs / 65.8 kg – Full-Contact)

STAR Undisputed Super Welterweight World Champion (154 lbs / 69.9 kg – Without Clinch-Fighting)

NKL / IKL Lightweight World Champion (155 lbs / 70.4 kg – Experimental)

WPKO Lightweight World Champion (145 lbs / 65.8 kg – Experimental)

WSMAC Open Division Champion (Catchweight – Experimental Mixed Martial Arts)

WSMAC Lightweight Champion (175 lbs / 79.5 kg – Experimental Mixed Martial Arts)

 

 

AWARDS & HONORS

1999 Martial Arts Hall of Fame (Martial ArtsOnline magazine, Martial Info.com)

1976-1984 STAR Career Champion – Top-Rated Kickboxer of All Time (StarSystemKickboxing.net)

1978 Black Belt Hall of Fame – Competitor of the Year (Black Belt magazine)

 

1980 Kickboxing Hall of Fame – Fighter of the Year (Official Karate magazine)

1978 Kickboxing Hall of Fame – Fighter of the Year (Official Karate magazine)

1977 Kickboxing Hall of Fame – Fighter of the Year (Official Karate magazine)

1976 Kickboxing Hall of Fame – Fighter of the Year (Official Karate magazine)

1975 Kickboxing Hall of Fame – Fighter of the Year (Official Karate magazine)

 

1986 Kickboxing Hall of Fame – Runner-Up Fighter of the Year (Official Karate & American Karate magazines)

 

 


Date

Result

Weight

Opponent

Location

Method

Round

Sanction

Rules

Promoter

Corroboration

W-L-D,KO,KKO

Titles – Notes

1993 Dec 04

WIN

154 lbs

Yoshihisa Tagami *2

(田上敬久)

“The Legend’s Final Challenge”

Mirage Hotel & Casino

Las Vegas, NV, USA

SPLIT DECISION

12

WKA

International

Blinky Rodriguez

S

videotaped

18,19,20,

38,39

53-1-2,40,10

Re-establishes Vacant WKA Super Welterweight World Title

Vacates WKA Super Welterweight World Title

1989 Aug 24

DRAW:

M-WIN

150 lbs

Shinya Asuka*3

(飛鳥信也)

“Super Powers Clash”

Tokyo Dome

Tokyo, JAPAN

NO-DECISION

DRAW

5

 

NJPW

Asian

Seiji Sakaguchi

S

1,31,33,40

52-1-2,40,10

1985 Nov 16

WIN

147 lbs

Tom Larouche

Northridge, CA, USA

DECISION

12

WKA

International

Ruben Urquidez

S

1,29

52-1-1,40,10

Re-establishes Vacant WKA Welterweight World Title

STAR recognition as Undisputed Welterweight World Champion

Vacates WKA Super Lightweight World Title

Vacates WKA Welterweight World Title

1984 Jan 15

WIN

145.5 lbs

66 kg

Iwan “The Tank” Sprang

Jaap Edenhal

Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS

TKO

(stopped)

5

(3:44)

MTBN

International

Thom Harinck

S

1,10

51-1-1,40,10

Wins MTBN Welterweight World Title

1983 Sep 12

WIN

142 lbs

“Iron” Fujimoto

(アイアン藤本)

Korakuen Hall

Tokyo, JAPAN

KO

6

(1:37)

WKA

International

All Japan Promotion Co.

S

Ashai-TV

Video 1

41

50-1-1,39,10

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 16th Defense

1983 Jan 08

WIN

142 lbs

Kunimasa Nagae

(長江国政)

Tokyo, JAPAN

KO

4

WKA

International

All Japan Promotion Co.

S

Ashai- TV

42,43

49-1-1,38,10

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 15th Defense

1982 Jun 21

WIN

142 lbs

Yutaka Koshikawa

(越川豊)

Vancouver, BC, CANADA

KICK-KO

(spin back kick)

6

(1:48)

WKA

International

Cliff Loree

S

CBC-TV

44

Video 1, 2

48-1-1,37,10

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 14th Defense

1982 Feb 02

WIN

154 lbs

Jesse Orrozzo

Queen Elizabeth Stadium

British Hong Kong, CHINA

DECISION

6

WKA

International

Russell Choi

Reno Lam

Simon Hung

S

TVB-TV

47-1-1,36,9

1981 Apr 09

WIN

142 lbs

Kong Fu Tak *4

Queen Elizabeth Stadium

British Hong Kong, CHINA

KICK-TKO

(cut)

4

WKA

International

Russell Choi

Reno Lam

Simon Hung

S

TVB-TV

10,11

Video 3

46-1-1,36,9

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 13th Defense

1980 Nov

WIN

None

Unreported #13  *5

(Chinese)

British Hong Kong, CHINA

KO

(body)

4

NONE

Thai

Unreported

 

3,10,52

45-1-1,35,8

Private Underground Event, STAR Excludes from STAR-rated Kickboxing Ratings

1980 Aug 09

NC

154 lbs

Billye Jackson *6

West Palm Beach Auditorium

West Palm Beach, FL, USA

NO CONTEST

7

WKA

Full-Contact

Richard Stacey

S

10,14,17,

27

Video 4

44-1-1,34,8

WKA Ruling Transmutes Outcome to No-Contest

1980 Apr 19

WIN

142 lbs

Frank Holloway *7

Vancouver, BC, CANADA

DECISION

9

WKA

International

Mike Gorval

S

USA Cable-TV

44-1-1,34,8

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 12th Defense

1980 Jan 26

WIN

142 lbs

Shinobu Onuki

(大貫忍)

Tropicana Casino Hotel

Las Vegas, NV, USA

KO

(left hook)

7

WKA

International

Howard Hanson

S

NBC-TV

2,5,12,45

Video 7

43-1-1,34,8

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 11th Defense

1979

WIN

142 lbs

Unreported #12

(Mexican)

Tijuana, BJ, MEXICO

KO

4

WKA

International

Angel Gutierrez

 

2

42-1-1,33,8

1979 Oct 01

WIN

142 lbs

Yoshimitsu Tamashiro

(玉城良光)

Tokyo, JAPAN

DECISION

9

WKA

AJKBA

International

Tatsumi Okamura

S

Ashai- TV

2,5,46

Video 1

41-1-1,32,8

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 10th Defense

1979 Sep 14

WIN

142 lbs

Frank Holloway

Ensenada, BJ, MEXICO

DECISION

9

WKA

International

Angel Gutierrez

S

2,3

40-1-1,32,8

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 9th Defense

1979

WIN

142 lbs

Unreported #11

(Thai)

Tijuana, BJ, MEXICO

KO

2

WKA

International

Angel Gutierrez

 

2

39-1-1,32,8

1979 Jul 05

WIN

142 lbs

Unreported #10

(Canadian)

Northland Pavillion

Edmonton, AB, CANADA

KO

 

WKA

International

Frank Lee

 

2

38-1-1,31,8

1979 May 26

WIN

145 lbs

Mike Hollobaugh

West Palm Beach Auditorium

West Palm Beach, FL, USA

KO

(takedown injury)

1

WKA

International

Don Haynes,

Steve Shepherd

 

53

37-1-1,30,8

1979 May 02

WIN

142 lbs

Rick Simerly

South Lake Tahoe, NV, USA

KO

6

WKA

International

Howard Hanson

S

NBC-TV

2,5,36

36-1-1,29,8

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 8th Defense

(PKA Lightweight World Title Vacated by Sanction in August 1978)

1978 Aug 02

LOSS

None

Prayud Sittiboonlert

(Prayout Srisontob -

 ประยุทธสิทธิบุญเลิ) *8

Denen Coliseum

Tokyo, JAPAN

DEC

6

NCSF

Asian

Kenji Kurosaki

S

1,6,13,26,

49

Video 6,8

35-1-1,28,8

STAR Classifies Bout as Modified Muay Thai, Excludes from STAR-Rated Kickboxing Ratings

1978 Apr 29

WIN

142 lbs

Shinobu Onuki *9

(大貫忍)

Tokyo, JAPAN

TKO

(injury)

3

(1:17)

WKA

AJKBA

Experimental

Tatsumi Okamura

S

Ashai- TV

2,5,6,45

Video 10,15

35-0-1,28,8

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 7th Defense

AJKBA Ruling Transmutes Disqualification to No-Contest

WKA Ruling Transmutes No-Contest to TKO upon Merger with AJKBA

1978 Feb 04

EXB

None

Frank Lee

Edmonton, AB, CANADA

EXHIBITION

2

WKA

International

Frank Lee

S

 

34-0-1,27,8

1978 Apr 10

WIN

142 lbs

Takeshi Naito *10

(内藤武)

Osaka, JAPAN

KICK-KO

(jump spin back kick)

1

(1:16)

NCSF

Experimental

Kenji Kurosaki

S

1,3,5,47

Video 8,10

34-0-1,27,8

1978 Apr 5

WIN

142 lbs

Dave Paul

Vancouver, BC, CANADA

TKO

4

WKA

International

Jim Wright

S

2,5,6

33-0-1,26,7

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 6th Defense

1977 Nov 14

WIN

142 lbs

Kunimatsu Okao *11

(岡尾国光)

“The Great War in Martial Arts”

Nippon Budokan Hall

Tokyo, JAPAN

KO

4

(1:31)

WKA

AJKBA

Experimental

Tatsumi Okamura, Ikki Kajiwara

S

Ashai-TV

2,5,9,10,

12,48

 Video 1, 9, 10

32-0-1,25,7

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 5th Defense

1977 Aug 02

WIN

142 lbs

Katsuyuki Suzuki *12

(鈴木勝幸)

“Real World Martial Arts Championship”

Nippon Budokan Hall

Tokyo, JAPAN

KO

(left hook)

6

WKA

AJKBA

(NJPW)

Experimental

Kanji “Antonio” Inoki,

Tatsumi Okamura

S

2,3,5,10,

12,31,32,

49,50

Video 1,9,

10

31-0-1,24,7

Retains WKA Super Lightweight World Title – 4th Defense

WKA Renames Weight Division

STAR Historic Recognition as Undisputed Super Lightweight World Champion

1977 Jul

WIN

145 lbs

Unreported #9 

(Mexican)

Tijuana, BC, MEXICO

KICK-KO

1

WKA

International

Angel Gutierrez

 

2

30-0-1,23,7

Retains WKA Lightweight World Title – 3rd Defense

1977 Apr 23

WIN

145 lbs

Howard Jackson

Hilton Hotel Casino

Las Vegas, NV, USA

TKO

(stopped)

4

(1:26)

PKA

Full-Contact

Don & Judy Quine

S

CBS-TV

5,10

Video 1,11

29-0-1,22,6

Retains PKA Lightweight World Title – 2nd Defense

1977 Mar 12

NC

145 lbs

Narongnoi

Kiatbandit  *13

Grand Olympic Auditorium

Los Angeles, CA, USA

NC

9

WKA

International

Howard Hanson,

Arnold Urquidez

S

2,3,5,10,

12,28

Video 5

28-0-1,21,6

WKA Lightweight World Title Bout – 1st Defense

First Official WKA Sanctioned Event

WKA Ruling Accepts California Athletic Commission’s No-Contest Declaration

1976 Oct 01

WIN

145 lbs

Eddie Andujar

Los Angeles, CA, USA

TKO

8

PKA

(WKA)

Full-Contact

Howard Hanson,

Don & Judy Quine

S

CBS-TV

2

28-0-1,21,6

Retains PKA Lightweight World Title – 1st Defense

WKA Founded Immediately after Event by Principal Promoter, Recognizes as WKA Lightweight World Champion

1976 Aug 28

WIN

145 lbs

Earnest Hart, Jr.

Neal Blaisdell Center

Honolulu, HI, USA

DECISION

9

PKA

Full-Contact

Howard Hanson,

Don & Judy Quine

S

CBS-TV

6,10,12

27-0-1,20,6

Re-establishes Vacant PKA Lightweight World Title

1976

WIN

155 lbs

Unreported #8

(Thai)

Tijuana, BJ, MEXICO

KICK-KO

3

NONE

Full-Contact

Angel Gutierrez

 

2

26-0-1,20,6

1976 Jun

WIN

155 lbs

Sanun Plypoolsup

Dallas, TX, USA

DEC

8

NONE

Full-Contact

Unreported

 

5,6,30

25-0-1,19,5

1976 Feb 14

DRAW

155 lbs

Earnest Hart, Jr. *14

Grand Olympic Auditorium

Los Angeles, CA, USA

TDRAW

(cut)

1

USCKC

Full-Contact

Arnold Urquidez, Howard Hanson

S

2,10,37

24-0-1,19,5

USCKC Lightweight Title Bout

1976

WIN

155 lbs

Unreported #7

(American)

Detroit, MI, USA

KO

1

IKL

Experimental

Valerie Williams

 

6

24-0-0,19,5

Retains IKL / NKL Lightweight World Title – 8th Defense

1975 Dec

WIN

155 lbs

Unreported #6  *15

(American)

Detroit, MI, USA

KO

2

NKL

(IKL)

Experimental

Valerie Williams

S

NBC-TV,

ABC-TV

34

23-0-0,18,5

Retains IKL / NKL Lightweight World Title – 7th Defense

IKL Ruling / STAR Finding transmutes disqualification

1975 Oct 11

WIN

155 lbs

Unreported #5

(American)

Los Angeles, CA, USA

KO

3

NONE

Full-Contact

Unreported

 

2

22-0-0,17,5

1975 Sep 21

WIN

160 lbs

Randy Sojot

Honolulu International Center Arena

Honolulu, HI, USA

TKO

3

NONE

Full-Contact

Howard Hanson, Mike Stone, Henry Awau

S

2,12

21-0-0,16,5

1975 Aug

WIN

155 lbs

Marcelino Torres

San Juan, PR, USA

KO

1

(0:29)

NKL

Experimental

Unreported

 

10

20-0-0,15,5

Retains NKL Lightweight World Title – 5th Defense

1975 Jul

WIN

155 lbs

Sammy Pace

Los Angeles, CA, USA

KO

1

NKL

Experimental

Chuck Norris

 

6

19-0-0,14,5

Retains NKL Lightweight World Title – 4th Defense

1975 Jun 28

WIN

155 lbs

Eddie Andujar

LA Stars vs. NY Puppets

Los Angeles Sports Arena

Los Angeles, CA, USA

DECISION

3

NKL

Experimental

Chuck Norris

 

6,35

18-0-0,13,5

Retains NKL Lightweight World Title – 3rd Defense

1975 Jun 21

WIN

175 lbs

Burnis White

Honolulu International Center

Honolulu, HI, USA

TKO

(toe injury)

2

WSMAC

Experimental

Tommy Lee

Marty Mains

S

8,22

17-0-0,13,5

Retains WSMAC Lightweight Title – 3rd Championship

1975 Jun 21

WIN

175 lbs

Sanun Plypoolsup

Honolulu International Center

Honolulu, HI, USA

TKO

(cut)

2

WSMAC

Experimental

Tommy Lee

Marty Mains

S

5,8,22

16-0-0,12,5

1975 May 30

WIN

155 lbs

Ken Riley

Oakland, CA, USA

KO

2

NONE

Experimental

Unreported

S

5

15-0-0,11,5

1975 May 16

WIN

175 lbs

Bill Henderson  *16

Los Angeles Sports Arena

Los Angeles, CA, USA

TKO

(quits)

3

(0:28)

WSMAC

Experimental

Tommy Lee

Marty Mains

S

NBC-TV

5,8,21,22

Video 12

14-0-0,10,5

Retains WSMAC Lightweight Title – 2nd Championship

1975 May 16

WIN

175 lbs

Roland Talton

Los Angeles Sports Arena

Los Angeles, CA, USA

KICK-KO

(knee as uppercut)

2

(2:04)

WSMAC

Experimental

Tommy Lee

Marty Mains

S

5,8,22

Video 13

13-0-0,9,5

1975 May 10

WIN

145 lbs

Tayari Casel *17

Nassau Veteran’s Memorial Coliseum

New York, NY, USA

DECISION

3

WPKO

Experimental

Aaron Banks

Bob Arum

S

ABC-TV

3,5,23,24

12-0-0,8,4

Establishes WPKO Lightweight World Title

1975 Mar

WIN

155 lbs

Demetrius “The Greek” Havanas *18

Tarrant County Convention Center

Ft. Worth, TX, USA

DECISION

3

NKL

Experimental

Unreported

S

5,16,25

11-0-0,8,4

Retains NKL Lightweight World Title – 2nd Defense

1975 Mar

WIN

155 lbs

Unreported #3

(American)

Atlanta, GA, USA

KICK-KO

2

NKL

Experimental

Unreported

S

6

10-0-0,8,4

Retains NKL Lightweight World Title – 1st Defense

1975 Mar

WIN

145 lbs

Ken Kolodziej

Milwaukee, WI, USA

KICK-KO

(knee)

4

NONE

Experimental

Dan Schroeder

S

6

9-0-0,7,3

1975 Feb

WIN

155 lbs

Butch Bell  *19

Savanah, GA, USA

TKO

2

NKL

Experimental

Chuck Norris, Arnold Urquidez

S

3,5,10,51

8-0-0,6,2

Establishes NKL Lightweight World Title

STAR Historic Recognition as Undisputed Super Welterweight World Champion

1974 Nov 15

WIN

Unlimited

Dana Goodson  *20

Honolulu International Center

Honolulu, HI, USA

DECISION

3

WSMAC

Experimental

Tommy Lee

Marty Mains

S

3,4,5,7,8,

10,12,15

Video 14

7-0-0,5,2

Establishes WSMAC Open Division Title

1974 Nov 15

WIN

Lightweight

Burnis White

Honolulu International Center

Honolulu, HI, USA

DECISION

3

WSMAC

Experimental

Tommy Lee

Marty Mains

S

3,7,8,10

6-0-0,5,2

Establishes WSMAC Lightweight Title

1974 Nov 14

WIN

Lightweight

Bill Rosehill

Honolulu International Center

Honolulu, HI, USA

TKO

(quit)

3

WSMAC

Experimental

Tommy Lee

Marty Mains

S

7,8,10

5-0-0,5,2

1974 Nov 14

WIN

Lightweight

Futi Semanu

Honolulu International Center

Honolulu, HI, USA

KO

2

WSMAC

Experimental

Tommy Lee

Marty Mains

S

7,8,10

4-0-0,4,2

1974 Nov 14

WIN

Lightweight

“Ironman” Tom Mossman

Honolulu International Center

Honolulu, HI, USA

KICK-KO (footsweep)

3

WSMAC

Experimental

Tommy Lee

Marty Mains

S

7,8,10

3-0-0,3,2

1974 Nov 14

WIN

Lightweight

Unreported #2 **21

(American)

Honolulu International Center

Honolulu, HI, USA

KICK-TKO

2

WSMAC

Experimental

Tommy Lee

Marty Mains

 

7,30

2-0-0,2,1

1974 Nov 14

WIN

Lightweight

Unreported #1 *21

(American)

Honolulu International Center

Honolulu, HI, USA

KO

2

WSMAC

Experimental

Tommy Lee

Marty Mains

 

7,30

1-0-0,1,0

 

LEGEND


KICKBOXING

Any stand-up combative sport where competitors fight with kicks and punches for a knockout or multi-judge decision over scheduled rounds divided by rest periods. Throughout the 1980s, the STAR System World Kickboxing Ratings strictly distinguished between kickboxing which prohibited clinch-fighting and muay Thai which permitted clinch-fighting. STAR regarded kickboxing and muay Thai as different sports. Since that era, combative sports have become more broadly divided between kickboxing and mixed martial arts. Sanctioning bodies have embraced competition and established kickboxing titles under multiple rule formats. For the sake of the historic record, all prominent rule formats have been indicated within ring record compilations.

 

Predominant Kickboxing Rule Formats

            Without Clinch-Fighting

INTERNATIONAL – low kicks and footsweeps allowed, no clinch-fighting, no throws (i.e. freestyle, boxe française-savate, WKA style)

FULL-CONTACT – no striking below the waist, no clinch-fighting, no throws, minimum or continual kick requirement (i.e. full-contact karate, American kickboxing, PKA style)

 

            Clinch-Fighting Optional

EXPERIMENTAL – variable rule schemes from the early formative period of kickboxing (i.e. USKA, WSMAC, NKL), or special negotiated rules to enable a mix-match between contestants from otherwise different combative sports (i.e. kickboxer versus muay Thai fighter)

 

            With Clinch-Fighting

ASIAN – low kicks and sweeps allowed, knees to body and legs allowed, limited clinch-fighting allowed, no throws (i.e. K-1, modified muay Thai, muay Euro, Japanese kick-boxing)

CHINESE – low kicks and sweeps allowed, knees to body and legs allowed, limited clinch-fighting allowed, throws and takedowns allowed (i.e. san shou, sanda)

THAI – low kicks allowed, knee and elbow strikes allowed, clinch-fighting permitted, no throws, scoring based on classic techniques (i.e. muay Thai, Thai boxing)

 

Sanctioning Groups

Official Outcomes

AJKBA – All Japan Kick-Boxing Association

              (全日本キックボクシング協会)

DECISION – three judges score for the winner

MAJORITY DECISION – two judges score for the winner, one even

NCSF – New Combative Sports Federation

            (Shin-Kakutogi Federation – 新格闘術連)

SPLIT DECISION – two judges score for the winner

DRAW – the judges score for both contestants evenly

MTBN – Muay Thai Bond Nederland (Netherlands Muay Thai Union)

MAJORITY DRAW – two judges score evenly

NJPW – New Japan Pro-Wrestling

             (Shin Nihon Puroresu – 新日本プロレ)

SPLIT DRAW – one judge scores for each contestant, one even

TDRAW – technical draw (fight stopped without basis for a decision)

NKL / IKL– National Karate League

                  (became International Karate League)

KO – knockout

KICK-KO (KKO) – kick-knockout

NONE – Independent promotion or smaller startup sanctioning group

KICK-TKO(TKKO) – technical kick-knockout

PKA – Professional Karate Association

TKO – technical knockout

STAR – Standardized Tournaments And Ratings System

NO-CONTEST – outcome officially set aside

USCKC – United States Contact Karate Championships

NO-DECISION – competitive bout conducted without judges

WKA – World Kickboxing Association

M-WIN – official draw or no-decision in which the contemporaneous

       media sports reporters express a dominant opinion about who won

WPKO – World Professional Karate Organization

WSMAC – World Series of the Marital Arts Championships

 














 

STAR Equalization Findings

For purposes of world-rated kickboxing competition and record keeping, STAR equalization findings differentiated between amateur and professional bouts, excluded bouts from other related combative sports (boxing, muay Thai, grappling), as well as arbitrated any peculiarities that occurred in the early and unruly era of kickboxing’s rapidly changing rules and uneven standards for fair competition. The STAR System had no interest in advancing one competitor over another and never interfered with a competitor’s official kickboxing record beyond the aforementioned distinctions.

 

*1

Undocumented Bouts: The STAR authenticated kickboxing record for Benny Urquidez documents all professional bouts for which some evidence could be located, while excluding any transitional pro-karate tournaments. The summary record count also includes 9 undocumented bouts which, based on the testimonials of WKA President Howard Hanson, STAR Administrator Paul Maslak, and Urquidez’s brothers and managers, STAR believes also occurred.

*2

Urquidez v Tagami: Despite a severe training injury to his left wrist, Urquidez refused to reschedule this bout. During the match, Urquidez slipped in round two, but continued to press the action in every round against an opponent who would not back down. Urquidez compensated for his diminished left hook with superior kicking attacks, edging out Tagami in most rounds. Tagami scored a flash-knockdown in round nine but, otherwise, neither contestant was hurt or ever in serious trouble. Fred Royers, the Japanese-requested judge and a former WKA world champion from Netherlands, scored the fight 116-113 for Urquidez. Judge Dayle Baykey, a WKA women’s champion from BC, Canada, scored the fight 115-113 for Tagami. The final judge scored the fight 114-113 for Urquidez. At ringside, former world champions Bill “Superfoot” Wallace and Kathy Long thought the bout was close enough to be called a draw; whereas recently-retired world champion Don “The Dragon” Wilson, after reviewing the videotape as color commentator, concluded that Urquidez had won convincingly.

*3

Urquidez v Asuka:  53,600 spectators. This non-title no-decision bout was promoted by New Japan Pro-Wrestling (NJPW), the group that originally helped introduce American kickboxers to Japan. Rules followed the Asian format: no throws, no elbows, but limited clinch-fighting permitted using knees strikes to the body. The NJPW reports the contestants fought for a knockout or draw; no judges.  Shinya Asuka is sometimes translated into English as Nobuya Asuka, a variation of the same name Shinya.

*4

Urquidez v Kong:  This world title bout was contested under WKA rules but on an open mat rather than within a roped ring.

*5

Urquidez v Unreported #13:  During a promotional tour after filming Force: Five, “The Jet” accepted a challenge match from a promoter sitting in the live audience of a TV talk show in Hong Kong: $20,000 plus a mink coat for his wife for unlimited rounds until someone wins. The next day, after payment was received at his hotel, Urquidez showed up inside an old cockfighting arena for gambling where his Chinese opponent shouted, “To the death!” before charging him using classic muay Thai techniques. Urquidez defeated him with a brutal fourth-round knockout. Because this bout was conducted without specific rules, officials, sanctioning authority or media coverage, and under circumstances that encouraged striking-while-holding, the STAR System disregarded this bout in its STAR kickboxing ratings and STAR summary record count for Urquidez. 

*6

Urquidez v Billye Jackson:  2,000 spectators. In March 1986, the WKA governing authority declared this WKA non-title bout to be a no-contest owing to uneven glove assignments and a coerced last-minute rule modification that unfairly impacted Urquidez’s performance in an otherwise close contest.  The STAR System authenticated this ruling directly with the WKA when it occurred. 

   This bout has been the subject of much persistent controversy:  Present at the live event were WKA President Howard Hanson, PKA/WKA promoter Jim Wilson, future WKA champion Don “The Dragon” Wilson, then-WKA world champion Graciela “The Goddess” Casillas, and STAR Chief Administrator Paul Maslak.  Billye Jackson was a last-minute substitute for scheduled opponent Glen Mehlmen in the main event bout. The STAR ratings chief personally witnessed the official weigh-in when Mr. Jackson’s representatives first announced that they would not allow Jackson to step into the ring unless Urquidez agreed to give up the WKA-allowed “leg kicks”.  Under duress and out of a sense of financial obligation to the promoter, Urquidez very reluctantly acquiesced.

    During the bout, Urquidez gave away the first three rounds as was his custom. Jackson won the fourth round outright, even scoring a flash knockdown.  Urquidez, however, was visibly impacted by the coerced promise to withhold low kicks. The flash knockdown occurred right after Urquidez started a combination that included a low kick. Urquidez stopped in mid-kick, leaving himself off balance and vulnerable to the flash knockdown. The low kick disorientation clearly affected Urquidez on a few other occasions over the multiple rounds. The fifth round was even. Urquidez then unleashed a non-stop hurricane of powerful kicking and punching combinations for the next two rounds, winning both by a wide margin. The physical fight was close, although Jackson was announced the winner. 

   Upon cutting the tape over the glove laces, the local WKA representative at the event discovered that Jackson and Urquidez were not using the same gloves. Jackson had worn his own better "knockout" Casanova gloves; Urquidez wore the softer Reyes gloves provided by the promoter. Urquidez's management immediately protested the decision to the WKA on the basis of:  a) the last-minute substitute of a tougher opponent, b) the last-minute heavier weight limit, c) the unequal gloves and d) the last-minute prohibition against WKA-allowed low kicks. At the time, the WKA executive officers were feuding with Urquidez’s manager over unrelated business matters and flatly refused to arbitrate their protest. The STAR ratings carried the loss on Mr. Urquidez's record for more than five years. 

   Eventually the WKA agreed to review the long-pending Urquidez protest and transmuted the decision owing to uneven glove assignments and the last-minute rule change. The WKA provided both Mr. Urquidez and Mr. Jackson with written confirmation of this ruling. The STAR System was also copied on the ruling as the WKA’s official rankings source.

*7

Urquidez v Holloway-2:  8,000 spectators.

*8

Urquidez v Prayud Sittiboonlert (ประยุทธสิทธิบุญเลิ):  5,000 spectators: Upon viewing video footage, the STAR System determined that clinch-fighting dominated the competition and classified this bout as modified muay Thai as opposed to STAR-rated kickboxing competition. Urquidez’s management alleged that when Urquidez’s scheduled opponent cancelled on short notice, Urquidez agreed to perform a no-decision bout against a Thai middleweight under the New Combative Sports Federation’s Shin Kakuto Jutsu (“New Fighting Art”) rules. At the end of the bout, a non-title points decision was awarded to Prayud Sittiboonlert (aka Prayout Srisontob in Japanese). 

   In 1981, the NCSF group was among the many Japanese sanctioning groups disbanded in the wake of an unrelated Yakuza scandal. Nevertheless, because the bout was conducted under rules that focused on striking-while-holding, the STAR System disregarded this bout in its kickboxing ratings. Further, because of the weight discrepancy as well an initial appearance of a possible manufactured outcome, STAR removed this bout from Urquidez’s STAR summary record count, although continued to show the bout on the STAR detailed record.  (At the time of this bout, the New Combative Sports Federation was known in English as Kakutogi, sometimes incorrectly shortened to Katogi, which actually means “combat sports” or more recently “mixed martial arts”.)

*9

Urquidez v Onuki-1:  This bout concluded when Onuki dislocated his shoulder from a throw by Urquidez. Urquidez was responding to a perceived attempt at a chokehold by Onuki. Judo throws, however, were illegal under Japanese rules though they were thought legal by the Americans under the mixed-rules for the bout. Urquidez was disqualified at the time of the bout. Under protest, given that “Tiger Mask” Saturo Sayama had been permitted to use every imaginable pro-wrestling throw in his bout against Marc Costello, the AJKBA then transmuted the disqualification to a no-contest.  Afterwards, for all future international title bouts, the Americans agreed to give up throws and the Japanese agreed to give up clinch-fighting. This understanding solidified the so-called International Rules pioneered by the WKA. In October 1981, when the AJKBA merged with the WKA, the WKA officially transmuted this disqualification to a TKO victory for Urquidez.

*10

Urquidez v Naito:  Takeshi Naito’s real name is Shinichi Miyakoshi (宮越真).

*11

Urquidez v Okao:  14,500 spectators. This event was appropriately billed as “The Great War in Martial Arts” (Kakutōgi Daisensō). After sustaining the hardest knockdown of his career from Okao’s right cross, Urquidez rose to his feet and retaliated against Okao with the longest continuous kick-and-punch combination in the sport’s championship history, ending with an unambiguous knockout victory for Urquidez. At the end of his career, Urquidez acknowledged that Okao had been his most dangerous opponent owing to his sledgehammer punching power, his ability to absorb punishment, and his relentless fighting spirit. One of the Japanese event promoters was Ikki Kajiwara, better-known in Japan as the famous manga author and filmmaker Asao Takamori. The bout inspired Kajiwara to create a local graphic novel (manga) series that featured a fictionalized Benny “The Jet” Urquidez as its protagonist.

*12

Urquidez v Suzuki (鈴木勝幸):  10,000 spectators; this bout was the semi-main event on the “Antonio” Kanji Inoki versus “Monster Man” Everett Eddy Real World Martial Arts Championship (wrestling-karate mix-match). For the Urquidez v Suzuki kickboxing match, compromise mixed-rules allowed knees to the body and low kicks but restricted clinch-fighting. Urquidez delighted the Japanese public with an unexpected knockout victory, launching his fad popularity.

*13

Urquidez v Narongnoi Kiatbandit:  In the final round, a riot broke out in the audience among Thai spectators when Narongnoi Kiatbandit was penalized for fouls. The California State Athletic Commission halted the proceedings and declared a no-contest outcome. The WKA officially accepted the Athletic Commission’s determination. When the STAR System verified this outcome in 1981, ringside judge Tom Schlesinger (later a WKA referee) as well as event promoter WKA President Howard Hanson separately reported that the fight was physically closer than the scores should have indicated and might have gone either way save for the two flash knockdowns and five throws scored by Urquidez, as well as for the foul deduction assessed to Kiatbandit. Narongnoi Kiatbandit was warned for knee and groin kicks in rounds 4, 5, 7 and 8. Referee Joey Orbillo, a retired heavyweight boxer, could have assessed penalties on each of those occasions but showed leniency owing to the unaccustomed rules for Kiatbandit as well as his own unfamiliarity with Thai fighting techniques: This bout was the first time a major American kickboxing champion encountered low kicks that targeted the thighs and groin or illegal hold-and-strike knee attacks. Most American competitors wore shin pads underneath their long pants. Nevertheless, according to Karate Illustrated magazine (August 1977), Urquidez was ahead in the fight going into the final round by a score of 113-110. A point deduction was finally assessed against Narongnoi in round 9 shortly before Narongnoi scored his only flash knockdown. Disruptive audience members then invaded the ring and halted the bout before the round concluded. (After this bout, Urquidez’s record was reported as 30-0-2 with 25 KOs.)

*14

Urquidez v Hart-1:  Hart suffered a cut lip resulting from a legal throw in the first round.  Following the three-punch rule fiasco in Detroit with Urquidez v Unreported #6, this event was the first in California promoted inside a boxing ring and without the three-punch rule.

*15

Urquidez v Unreported #6:  The rules at the time required one kick for every three punches. Urquidez was disqualified for knocking out his opponent with a fourth punch. This outrageous ruling, that awarded a victory to Urquidez’ knocked out opponent, received national exposure through the tabloid news show “Weekend” on NBC-TV and “ABC Sports Report” on ABC-TV’s Wide World of Sports. The bout’s referee had been the opponent’s martial arts instructor. The opponent’s name has faded into history. This embarrassment to the new sport put further television coverage at risk, provoked interest in regulating the sport by several state athletic commissions, and motivated Chuck Norris to expel the president of the National Karate League (NKL) and reform as the short-lived International Karate League (IKL). An IKL action, as well as a subsequent STAR Finding, transmuted this disqualification into a KO victory for Urquidez.

*16

Urquidez v Henderson: WSMAC competition was conducted inside a boxing ring with competitors wearing Safe-T-Equipment. Footsweeps, throws and pins were permitted. Henderson was trained by Sil Lum kung-fu sifu Douglas Wong. Urquidez was awarded a $3,000 championship prize. The fight aired on NBC-TV’s “The Champions”.

*17

Urquidez v Casel: 5,000 spectators; televised on ABC-TV’s “Wide World of Sports” with color commentary by Frank Gifford and Ed Parker; originally scheduled for Madison Square Garden was moved to the Nassau Coliseum. Peculiar title bout in which kung-fu stylist Casel attempted to fight Urquidez from the ground, eventually receiving warnings by the referee for failing to engage. Once on his feet Casel engaged Urquidez aggressively, though Urquidez narrowly dominated. Casel later protested that, though allowed under the rules, his groundfighting tactics were not appropriately respected by the referee.

*18

Urquidez v Havanas: 5,000 spectators. Hard fought battle between two aggressive fighters with good punching and good kicking. Havanas tended to kick higher and faster but with less power. Urquidez won round 1, Havanas round 2 and Urquidez round 3. Final score: 42-39 for Urquidez. (Before this bout, press coverage reported Urquidez with 5 knockout victories in the National Karate League, 2 more victories than his STAR record presently details.)

*19

Urquidez v Bell: NKL rules prohibited cling-fighting but included throws, footsweeps and no more than three consecutive punches without a kick. Urquidez counted Butch Bell among the most difficult opponents of his long career owing to his great punching power.

*20

Urquidez v Goodson:  6,000 spectators; Bob Wall emceed. Rules allowed 3 by 3-minute rounds with 1-minute rest periods, punching, kicking, knee and elbow strikes, footsweeps, throws, grappling and submission holds. Elbow pads required for elbow strikes. Point awards included 3 points for takedowns with 5-second hold or simulated follow-up combination, 2 points for takedowns without follow-up, 2 points for carrying opponent out of the ring, 1 point for each effective blow or combination. Striking a downed opponent was prohibited. Wins were recognized by forfeit, decision, submission, 7-count KO or TKO. Goodson stood 6 feet 1 inch tall and weighed 230 pounds compared with Urquidez at 5 foot 6 inches and 145 pounds. Urquidez throws and pins Goodson in the third round for 3 points before resuming the bout from their feet. Urquidez wins the $5,000 championship prize; Goodson $1100.

*21

Urquidez v Unreported #1 and #2: According to Professional Karate magazine (March 1975), 58 contestants fought on the first day of competition. Coverage began with the semi-finals. The names of Urquidez’s first two opponents have been lost to time.

 

Corroboration

1

STAR System Administrative Inquiry (1984, 1993): Personal testimonial by Urquidez manager Stuart Sobel

2

WKA Internal Records (1982): Presented to the STAR System by WKA President Howard Hanson

3

STAR System Administrative Inquiry (1982): Personal testimonial by Benny Urquidez

4

STAR System Administrative Inquiry (1981): Personal testimonial by Dana Goodson and Bob Wall

5

Corcoran, John (December 1994).The Martial Arts Sourcebook, Perennial, Harper Collins, New York, NY, Chapter 8

6

Official Karate magazine (Jan 1975-Dec 1980). Charlton Publications, Inc., New York, NY, USA

7

“News and Reviews: Inter-Art Melee Earns Urquidez $5000 Prize” (March 1975). Professional Karatemagazine, Universal Publications of America, Oklahoma City, OK, USA, p. 8-9

8

Editors: Monahan, Terri and Gower, Dave (November 1975). “Tommy Lee Presents: World Series Martial Arts Championships”, Oriental Fighting Arts magazine, Can-Am Media, Inc., Toronto, CANADA, pp. 8, 58-63.

9

“Urquidez Retains Title with Knockout over Okao” (Apr 1978). Black Beltmagazine (digitized by Google Books), Rainbow Publications, Inc., Burbank,

CA, USA, p. 10. Retrieved on 1 July 2011.

10

Coleman, Jim (December 1985). “Benny ‘The Jet’ Urquidez’ Greatest Fights”, Black Belt magazine (digitized by Google Books), Rainbow Publications, Inc., Burbank, CA, USA, pp. 37-42, 105-109. Retrieved on 1 July 2011.

11

“I Know This Is Hong Kong But Why Are They Using Wing Chun?” (Nov 1981). Karate Monthly magazine, Clay Communication Group, Inc., Hollywood,

CA, USA, pp. 56-59

12

Marlow, Chris (Nov 1981). Karate Monthly magazine, “The WKA: The First Worldwide Sanctioning Body For Full-Contact Karate,” Clay Communication Group, Inc., Hollywood, CA, USA, pp. 60-70

13

Corcoran, John (December 1979). “The Case against Kick Boxing”, Inside Kung-Fu magazine, CFW Enterprises, Inc., Hollywood, CA, USA, pp. 28-35

14

Sawyer, J. Mike (October 1980). “Benny’s Jet Fizzles as Jackson Sizzles,” Sport Karate magazine, p. 11

15

Sobel, Stuart (January 1981). “The Saga of a Super Champ,” Official Karate magazine, Charlton Publications, Inc., New York, NY, USA, p. 18

16

“National Karate League Action: Full Contact at Ft. Worth” (Summer 1975), Traditional TaeKwon-Do magazine, P. 50

17

“’Billy Jack’ Jackson” (December 1980), KICK Illustrated magazine, CFW Enterprises, Inc., Hollywood, CA, USA, p. 18

18

Jeffrey, Douglas (April 1994). “’The Jet’ Nearly Shot Down in ‘Farewell’ Victory”, Black Belt magazine (digitized by Google Books), Rainbow Publications, Inc., Burbank, CA, USA, pp. 18-23. Retrieved on 1 July 2011.

19

Wallace, Bill (June 1994). “Urquidez vs. Tagami: It Could Have Gone Either Way”, Black Belt magazine (digitized by Google Books), Rainbow Publications, Inc., Burbank, CA, USA, p. 17. Retrieved on 1 July 2011.

20

Kessler, Sandra E. (September 1994). “Benny ‘The Jet’ Fights Back”, Black Belt magazine (digitized by Google Books), Rainbow Publications, Inc., Burbank,

CA, USA, pp. 64-70, 112. Retrieved on 1 July 2011.

21

Farkas, Emil and Sobel, Stuart (December 1975). “Western Wrap-Up”, Official Karate magazine, Charlton Publications, Inc., New York, NY, USA, [reprinted in: Weiss, Al and Weiss, David (1997). The Official History of Karate in America, Pro-Action Publishing, Los Angeles, CA, USA, p. 274.]

22

Nishioka, Nancy (November 1975). “2nd World Series Martial Arts Championships in Hawaii”, Black Belt magazine (digitized by Google Books), Rainbow Publications, Inc., Burbank, CA, USA, pp. 56-58. Retrieved on 1 July 2011.

23

“Aaron Banks’ World Professional Karate Championships” (Oct 1975). Official Karate magazine, Charlton Publications, Inc., New York, NY, USA,

pp. 34-36, 54, 58

24

Casel, Tayari (Oct 1975). “An Open Letter from Tayari Casel”, Official Karate magazine, Charlton Publications, Inc., New York, NY, USA, p. 37

25

Ethington, Duane (August 1975). “Tournament Circuit: Texans Outshine Stars”, Official Karate magazine, Charlton Publications, Inc., New York, NY, USA,

pp. 41-43, 62-65

26

Maslak, Paul (1985). “Full-Contact Karate: Down for the Count or Headed for the Big Time?”, Black Belt Yearbook magazine, Rainbow Publications, Inc, Burbank, CA, USA, p. 121

27

Coleman, Jim [as Editor] (Jun 1994). “What Happened to ‘The Jet’s’ Loss?”, Black Beltmagazine (digitized by Google Books), Rainbow Publications, Inc., Burbank, CA, USA, p. 8. Retrieved on 17 July 2011.

28

Karate Illustrated (Aug 1977). Rainbow Publications, Inc., Burbank, CA, USA

29

Springer, Steve (November 17, 1985). “Urquidez Wins 4th Kick-Boxing Crown”, Los Angeles Times, Times-Mirror Company, Los Angeles, CA, USA, at http://articles.latimes.com/1985-11-17/sports/sp-7172_1_heel-kick . Retrieved 9 May 2011.

30

Administrative Inquiry (20 July 2011). Personal testimonial by Benny Urquidez

31

New Japan Pro-Wrestling Fan Site at http://www.puroresufan.com/njpw/results7080s.html. Retrieved on 8 August 2011.

32

The Great Hisa’s PuroResu Dojo at http://www.puroresu.com/newjapan/results/nj197706asia.html. Retrieved on 8 August 2011. 

33

 Supercards and Tournaments at http://www.prowrestlinghistory.com/supercards/japan/newjapan/njindex.html. Retrieved on 8 August 2011. 

34

Corcoran, John (Summer 1976). “Karate in America: West Coast”, Official Karate Yearbook magazine, Charlton Publications, Inc., New York, NY, USA,

pp. 52-55, 76-80.

35

 Weiss, Al and Weiss, David (1997). “The Legends of Full Contact and the New Gladiators”, The Official History of Karate in America, Pro-Action Publishing, Los Angeles, CA, USA, p. 33.

36

Farkas, Emil and Sobel, Stuart (January 1979). “Western Wrap-Up”, Official Karate magazine, Charlton Publications, Inc., New York, NY, USA, [reprinted in: Weiss, Al and Weiss, David (1997). The Official History of Karate in America, Pro-Action Publishing, Los Angeles, CA, USA, p. 278.]

37

Farkas, Emil and Sobel, Stuart (July 1976). “Western Wrap-Up”, Official Karate magazine, Charlton Publications, Inc., New York, NY, USA, [reprinted in: Weiss, Al and Weiss, David (1997). The Official History of Karate in America, Pro-Action Publishing, Los Angeles, CA, USA, p. 288.]

38

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39

「GRB速報ニュース」[GBR News Flash] (September 22, 2006) at http://gbring.com/sokuho/news/2006_09/0922_burai.htm. Retrieved on 7 September 2011.

40

「VOL.14 新日ドーム大会全記録」[VOL.14 New Japan Pro-Wrestling Tokyo Dome Tournament Record] at http://www.twc-wrestle.com/jyoho9701.html. Retrieved on 7 September 2011.

41

「昭和のキックボクシング」[“Kickboxing in the Showa Era”] at http://syouwakickboxing.blog.so-net.ne.jp/index/3. Retrieved on 7 September 2011.

42

「長江国政インタビューその1」[“Kunimasa Nagae Interview Part 1”] at http://ipocket.heteml.jp/cgi-bin/interview_isami/col4.cgi?mode=main&no=46. Retrieved on 7 September 2011

43

「スポーツナビ|格闘技|K-1|コラム」[“Sports Links - Martial Arts - K-1 - Column”] at http://sportsnavi.yahoo.co.jp/fight/k1/column/200302/0225sn_01.html. Retrieved on 7 September 2011.

44

検証、ベニー・ユキーデ[“Maximum MMA: Benny Urquidez, Verified”] (12 March 2010). Ameblo.jp website at http://ameblo.jp/maximum-mma/entry-10468462604.html. Retrieved on 7 September 2011.

45

ベニー・ユキー[“Benny Urquidez”] (16 July 2011). Japan Wikipedia at http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%99%E3%83%8B%E3%83%BC%E3%83%BB%E3%83%A6%E3%82%AD%E3%83%BC%E3%83%87. Retrieved on September 7 2011.

46

「オーエンジャイ&東京北斎ジム公式ホームページ」[Wongwenya & Tokyo Hokusei Gym Official Website] at http://www2u.biglobe.ne.jp/~wongwen/old/index.html. Retrieved on 07 September 2011.

47

「会長紹介-拳粋会空手道宮越道場」[“Introduction to Chairman Miyakoshi”], Kensuikai Karatedo Miyakoshi Dojyo website at http://www5.atpages.jp/~kensui/index.php?%B2%F1%C4%B9%BE%D2%B2%F0. Retrieved on 07 September 2011.

48

「全日本キックボクシング“格闘技大戦争”」[“All-Japan Kick-Boxing: ‘Fighting the Great War’”] (14 November 1977). So-net website at http://www003.upp.so-net.ne.jp/back-kick/record8.htm.  Retrieved on 2011 September 07.

49

「第1次格闘技ブーム年表」[“Chronology of the First Martial Arts Boom”], Asahi-net website at http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/~yf7m-on/kakunen.html.  Retrieved on 2011 September 07.

50

アントニオ猪木対ザ・モンスターマン[“The Monsterman vs Antonio Inoki”] (11 April 2008). Quiz & Vale Tudo website at http://blog.livedoor.jp/russianfook/archives/51085427.html#comments. Retrieved on 2011 September 11.

51

Administrative Inquiry (22 September 2011). Personal phone call testimonial from Arnold Urquidez.

52

Henson, Steve (August 17, 1985).“The Jet: Born to Brawl”, Los Angeles Times, Times-Mirror Company, Los Angeles, CA, USA, at http://articles.latimes.com/1985-08-17/sports/sp-2240_1_benny-urquidez. Retrieved 2011 May 09.

53

Otterson, Chuck (1979 May 27).  “Shepherd Dominates Kick Boxing Bout,” The Palm Beach Post, Cox Enterprises, West Palm Beach, FL, p. E6 SPORTS.


Other References

·         Benny Urquidez’s website at http://www.bennythejet.com/. Retrieved on 06 August 2011.

·         WKA USA website at http://www.wkausa.com/wka-history.html, “WKA History”. Retrieved on 12 August 2011.

·         Chapnick, Morris (February 1975). “A Black Belt in the Boxing Ring,” The Fighters magazine, Rainbow Publications, Inc., Burbank, CA, USA, p. 38-44.

·         Durand, Michel (3 Avril 2008). “Benny ‘The Jet’ Urquidez, Simply Gifted”, http://karate-in-english-lewis-wallace.blogspot.com/2008/04/benny-jet-urquidez-simply-gifted.html. Retrieved on 1 June 2011

·         McCoy, Kid (03-15-2007).  “Japan’s Kickboxing: A Condensed History”, kyokushin4life.com website at http://www.kyokushin4life.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2501 . Retrieved 1 June 2011

·         Colvin, Richard Lee (November 30, 1993). “Ready for Takeoff”, Los Angeles Times, Times-Mirror Company, Los Angeles, CA, USA, at http://articles.latimes.com/1993-11-30/local/me-62366_1_jet-center . Retrieved 9 May 2011

·         Urquidez, Benny “The Jet” as told to Franck, Loren (July 1985). “A Legend’s Advice: How to Become a Full-Contact Karate Fighter”, Karate Illustrated magazine, Rainbow Publications, Inc., Burbank, CA, USA, pp. 48-53

·         Baker, Timothy (March 1985). “Legs: The Target of Champions” (Cover Story), Black Belt magazine (digitized by Google Books), Rainbow Publications, Inc., Burbank, CA, USA, pp.20-25, 98, 100-102

·         Goldman, Stuart (September 22, 1983). “A Family of Fighting Champions”, Los Angeles Times, Times-Mirror Company, Los Angeles, CA, USA, Part V, pp. 25-26

·         Royers, Fred (Februari 1983).“Benny ‘The Jet’ Urquidez:  in de ban van de ring”, Zendokan magazine, Holam Groep, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Vol. 3 No. 2, pp. 40-45

·         Corcoran, John and Farkas, Emil (1983). Martial Arts: Traditions, History, People, Gallery Books, W.H. Smith Publishers, Inc., New York, NY

·         CBC-TV (1982). CANADA

·         TVB-TV (1981). BRITISH HONG KONG

·         Sobel, Stuart with Corcoran, John (July 1981). “Close Up: Benny Urquidez – The King of Full-Contact Karate Advocates Traditional Values” (Cover Story),

KICK Illustratedmagazine, CFW Enterprises, Inc., Hollywood, CA, USA, pp. 44-51

·         “Wallace vs. Urquidez: Who Would Win?” (August 1980). KICK Illustratedmagazine,CFW Enterprises, Inc., Hollywood, CA, USA,pp. 56-59

·         Sobel, Stuart (June 1980). “Nothing Beats a Great Pair of Legs!: The Case for Kick-Boxing”,Inside Kung-Fu magazine,CFW Enterprises, Inc., Hollywood, CA, USA,pp. 35-39

·         USA Cable-TV (1980). USA

·         NBC-TV Sports (1979-1980). USA

·         Ashai-TV (1978-1979). JAPAN

·         Goldman, Stuart (March 1979).The Baddest Dude In The World”,Hustler magazine, LFP, Inc., Los Angeles, CA, USA, pp. 48-50, 99-100, 105

·         Goldman, Stuart (January 1979). “A Candid Interview with Benny Urquidez: The Deadliest Fighter of Them All”, Official Karate magazine, Charlton Publications, Inc., New York, NY, USA, pp. 28-31, 62

·         CBS “Sports Spectacular” (1976-1977). USA

·         NBC-TV’s “The Champions” (1975). USA

·         ABC-TV’s “Wide World of Sports” (1975). USA

·         ABC-TV’s “Sports Report” (1975). USA


Benny “The Jet” Urquidez - Exposé

More than for any other champion, the Wikipedia entry for Benny “The Jet” Urquidez motivated the creation of this website. The misstatements, misinterpretations and inexactitudes have unfairly disparaged a very honorable man who was the first great champion to cast a truly international shadow for his sport. Apparently his Wikipedia entry has gone unchallenged for some time because these same disparagements have metastasized across the Internet.


200-0 Record

WIKIPEDIA excerpt - Retrieved 18 May 2011
 On his own official webpage, Urquidez lists his fight record as 200-0, and says he was 63-0, with 57 knockouts in title defenses.

Okay, it’s true. Benny’s website boasts a 200-0 fight record. Sounds inflated to most people, right? I suspect that boast prompted the scurrilous slams contained within his Wikipedia entry.

 

When I last spoke with Benny about fifteen years ago, if you asked him casually, he would tell you he had over 200 fights with a championship record of 63-0; he does not count the non-title fights. Urquidez is not being deceptive: He’s telling it how he remembers it.  In fact, Urquidez has much justification for the way he remembers his ring career.  

 

First, no one should doubt Urquidez’ claim of over 200 fights. Witnesses abound; at least they did twenty years ago when his STAR ring record was first compiled. The problem was that, between tournament events, pro-team events, street fights and ring fights, less than a quarter of his bouts were properly documented.

 

In the years just prior to the inaugural PKA World Championships in 1974, tournament karate promoters throughout the United States began to offer prize money to the grand champions of “professional karate” events. Competitors wore Jhoon Rhee’s Safe-T-Equipment and fought with “hard-contact” kicks and punches within the limitations of the traditional tournament karate scoring system. Follow-up combinations were interrupted. Urquidez entered many of these pro tournaments, fighting multiple opponents in a day.

 

 WKA founder Howard Hanson told me that in spring 1973, Henry Awau, Mike Stone and he introduced “Mainland versus Hawaii” pro team events to Honolulu, pitting California teams against Hawaii teams. The competition was sometimes conducted on raised stages or in boxing rings. Benny Urquidez quickly emerged as a popular headliner in Hawaii, winning every match in multiple events. These events were mentioned briefly in Official Karate magazine (July 1976, page 15) and Karate Monthly magazine (November 1981, pages 61-62).

 

Many of Benny’s 200 fights came from these early pro-karate events. Records were not kept of opponents nor even of many events. Later, after the modern kickboxing movement began under the name “full-contact karate,” Honolulu promoter Tommy Lee recruited Urquidez for his distinctive World Series of the Martial Arts Championships in good measure because of Benny’s reputation from Hanson’s team events. Urquidez also then participated in team full-contact karate events for the National Karate League, another early sanctioning body.


(Left to right) NKL "Los Angeles Stars" teammates Lenny Ferguson, Benny Urquidez, Manit Chaursan, Manuel Hernandez, Blinky Rodriguez
and Ruben Urquidez in 1975.


The photograph on the left was snapped just prior to Urquidez’ team matchup against Demetrius “The Greek” Havanas in Ft. Worth, Texas. At the time, Traditional TaeKwon-Do magazine (Summer 1975, pages 50-52) reported that Benny had won five bouts by knockout in NKL team events of which STAR could only authenticate two. In this same year, I personally attended an NKL full-contact karate team event near Oakland, California, in which Benny’s team participated. I did not keep records, but I believe Benny fought on that card. Clearly, many of Benny’s fights remain lost to time.


The STAR System’s Authenticated Kickboxing Record for Benny Urquidez documents all professional full-contact bouts for which some evidence could be located, while excluding any transitional pro-karate tournaments. It also mentions 8 undocumented bouts which, based on the testimonials of WKA President Howard Hanson and Urquidez’ older brother Arnold as well as his late brothers Ruben and Mando, likely also occurred. (See Urquidez record)


 Urquidez v Suzuki

WIKIPEDIA excerpt - Retrieved 18 May 2011

Biography


The Suzuki fight was materialized due to the fact that the WKA, then newly formed organization, could not compete against the PKA in the stateside, therefore, WKA president Howard Hanson and vice-president Arnold Urquidez had to look for actions in overseas. [9]

Beyond the badly written English in the above Wikipedia excerpt…  Let's examine Note [9] – BAB Japan. The Dave Cater Interview. 格闘技通信No.9 Kakutougi Tsuushin; "Martial Arts Network No.9", August 1, 1987, Japan.

 

In a 6 May 2011 personal email to me, the cited source [9] for the above account, former Inside Kung-fu editor Dave Cater, did not recall having made this statement and does not endorse it. In actual fact, as explained to me by WKA President Howard Hanson, the WKA broke away from the PKA because the two promotional entities could not come to terms about splitting television revenues. Consequently, while continuing to promote in the Western US and Canada, the WKA also ventured into Japan in search of new television arrangements.  

 

PKA Title Vacated

WIKIPEDIA excerpt - Retrieved 18 May 2011

Biography


In the same event, Benny Urquidez KOed Howard Jackson, but soon his lightweight title was stripped by the PKA, and so both Eddy and Urquidez had no action in the US, and had to look for fights overseas.

Similarly, this Wikipedia conjecture that Urquidez “had no action in the US, and had to look for fights overseas” is flatly false. In August 1979, when the PKA vacated Urquidez’ PKA world title for failure to defend, I was present with then-PKA Events Coordinator John Corcoran at PKA headquarters on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood. The following day, as the new editor of Inside Kung-Fu magazine, I met Benny Urquidez for the first time at Ed Parker’s International Karate Tournament in Long Beach. I asked Urquidez why he had not defended the PKA title. He told me he would fight anyone for the right price.  He possessed the WKA world title which was more meaningful to him. In short, the PKA had not offered him a large enough purse to bother with their title defense or a good reason to accept their requirement for PKA exclusivity.

 

Clearly Urquidez could have continued to fight in the United States and, in fact, had defeated Rick Simmerly in South Lake Tahoe over NBC-TV within the previous two months and would fight again over NBC-TV from Las Vegas within the next four months. The champ’s answer to me was my first exposure to how professional champions think about their match ups. Urquidez had a wife and family to support.  Unlike his fight fans, Benny let pride play a secondary role to financial arrangements in his career choices. Throughout my subsequent decade of experience as a magazine journalist, professional ring observer and sports official, I found that most career fighters adhered to this same priority. (See Urquidez record)

 

Urquidez v Tagami

WIKIPEDIA excerpt - Retrieved 18 May 2011

Biography


In 1984, he fought Ivan Sprang in Amsterdam under modified Muay Thai rules (no elbows), winning by 6th round TKO. His ring career largely came to a halt after 1985, and he retired after facing Yoshihisa Tagami at the age of 41. He won by the controversial decision.

Urquidez defeated Tagami in a decision handed down by neutral, veteran, world class judges in Las Vegas: former WKA world champion Fred Royers of Netherlands, WKA women’s champion Dayle Baykey of Canada, and a Nevada Athletic Commission regular. Tagami and his fans may have felt that the outcome should have gone the other way. I witnessed this bout and thought it was close. But you must clearly beat a champion to become a champion. Urquidez won his final world title by split decision, meaning two judges scored for Urquidez and one judge scored for Tagami. That’s 2-1, not quite the same as a “controversial decision”. 

 

Urquidez v Narongnoi

WIKIPEDIA excerpt - Retrieved 18 May 2011

Controversial fight decisions


Urquidez fought in two bouts which were eventurally ruled no-contest (NC). The first, in Los Angeles in March 1977, was a nine-round NC (WKA) against Thai boxer Narongnoi Kiatbandit.

Again, the outcome is not really so controversial. This 12 March 1977 WKA world title bout between Benny Urquidez and Narongnoi Kiatbandit was declared a no-contest by the California State Athletic Commission. In the final round, after the referee assessed Narongnoi with a one point penalty, a riot broke out in the audience among the Thai fans that eventually halted the proceedings with mere seconds remaining on the clock. Scores were never obtained for the final ninth round. The Athletic Commission collected the master scorecard and refused tabulation. The WKA, as a new sanctioning entity, accepted the Athletic Commission’s no-contest ruling. (See Urquidez record, STAR Finding *6)

 

What else were the governing officials supposed to do? At the event, a decision in either competitor’s favor would have exacerbated an already explosive situation. Later, of course, there were no scores available for round 9.

 

Understandably, over the decades, much speculation has elevated this bout in some circles to mythic proportions. It was, after all, the WKA’s premiere world title fight as well as the first time a major American kickboxing champion had been matched against a major muay Thai champion.

 

Then … no outcome: You couldn’t have a better lightning rod for conspiracy addicts.

 

In 1981, the STAR System investigated this bout’s official ruling. We questioned the California State Athletic Commission, the event promoter WKA President Howard Hanson, ringside judge Tom Schlesinger (also a PKA and WKA referee), and several eyewitnesses as well as Benny Urquidez. We determined the following facts:

 

  1. RULES: Punching and kicking, including low kicks to the thighs, footsweeps and throws were permitted to legal target areas. Clinching was allowed only to the extent that it led immediately to a throw or footsweep. Holding and striking as well as knee and elbow strikes were prohibited.
  2. KNOCKDOWNS: Urquidez scored flash knockdowns against Narongnoi in rounds 3 and 6. Narongnoi scored a flash knockdown against Urquidez in round 9. Each knockdown added an extra point advantage to the contestant who scored the knockdown.
  3. THROWS & FOOTSWEEPS: Urquidez scored throws against Narongnoi in rounds 2, 3, 7 and 9. Urquidez also scored a footsweep against Narongnoi in round 8. Under the rules, throws and footsweeps did not affect the score as much as a knockdown. They equated more with a powerful kick and punch combination that connected.
  4. WARNINGS: The referee warned Narongnoi for hold-and-hit knee strikes in rounds 5, 8 and 9, and for groin kicks in rounds 4, 5 and 8. Urquidez was allowed a short recovery period following a groin kick in round 8.
  5. POINT DEDUCTION: The referee finally assessed Narongnoi with a 1-point deduction in round 9 for a hold-and-hit knee strike. The referee could have assessed penalty deductions with each of the previous warnings but showed leniency owing to the unaccustomed rules for Narongnoi. Referees today would not allow any competitor that much latitude.
  6. NO-CONTEST: The official ruling was no-contest. Promoter Howard Hanson and ringside judge Tom Schlesinger separately told the STAR System that, aside from the knockdowns, throws and point deduction, the physical effectiveness of each fighter was fairly even.

 

Now, in light of the rules and rulings, I would invite any fair-minded martial arts fan to watch the entire fight. A poor quality home movie shot from the upper seating at the Grand Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles appeared on YouTube as recently as September 2011. Set aside your emotions; refer to the official rulings cited above; then score each round on the 10-point must system (winner receives 10 points, loser 9 or less). Just from the knockdowns and throws, Urquidez enjoyed roughly a 3 to 5 point scoring advantage over 9 rounds. Some muay Thai fans argue that, after a knockdown, Urquidez was saved from a certain knockout by the crowd. Nonsense. The flash knockdown occurred early in the round and was due more to Urquidez being off balance than from the power of the kick. By the time the crowd invaded the ring, Urquidez and Naraongnoi had been exchanging evenly for more than a minute.


Under WKA rules, Urquidez should have been awarded a unanimous decision. There is really no doubt: The Jet was robbed.


Urquidez v Billye Jackson

WIKIPEDIA excerpt - Retrieved 18 May 2011

Controversial fight decisions


Next, Urquidez fought to a seven-round NC (WKA) againt Billy Jackson in West Palm Beach, Florida on August 8, 1980. The fight was first reported as a seven-round decision for Jackson; then was changed to a seventh round technical draw, and then to a no-contest. The no-contest status of these fights has been corroborated in print by Paul Maslak (Chief Administrator of the Star System). However, recent research has come up with new data which casts a shadow on Urquidez's "undefeated" record. In the November 1984 issue of Official Karate Magazine, on page 45, Paul Maslak in his STAR System Ratings (for March 1984) lists Urquidez as the Star System World Super-Lightweight Champion with a record of 56 wins, 1 loss, 1 draw, with 47 wins by knockout, and 14 wins by kick-knockout. Almost a year later in the September 1985 issue of Official Karate (page 44), Urquidez's record is still listed as 56-1-1. In an article for Inside Karate Magazine, Urquidez's record up to November 1985 was listed as 75-0-2, 47 KO, 14 KKO (page 25).

The August 1980 WKA non-title bout with Billye Jackson was transmuted to a no-contest by the WKA governing authority owing to uneven glove assignments and a last-minute rule change that unfairly impacted Urquidez' performance in an otherwise close match. (See Urquidez record, STAR Finding *3) The STAR ratings as published in Official Karate magazine and elsewhere did not reflect this outcome until the WKA officially ruled. But the WKA waited five years to rule on the Benny Urquidez-Billye Jackson bout.

 

The November 1985 issue of Inside Karate transparently inverted the digits in Urquidez’ record to show 75 wins. The appropriate number at the time was 57 wins as was reflected in the STAR ratings. I was not editor of Inside Karate; I cannot speak for why a retraction was or was not printed.


Urquidez v Okao

WIKIPEDIA excerpt - Retrieved 18 May 2011

Other Record Manipulations


Urquidez has faced controversy over apparent manipulation of his actual fight record and over accounts of his fights.


The first such allegation arose over claims made after a scheduled fight against Japanese champion Kunimatsu Okao. It has been maintained in various promotional materials since that, "the former undefeated All Japan Champion Kunimatsu Okao came out of retirement to challenge Urquidez to avenge the loss of Suzuki...' However, in Japan, it was widely known that Okao was not undefeated.

Urquidez had nothing whatsoever to do with promotional materials surrounding his fights and should not be blamed for errors contained within such publicity. In that era, there were virtually no Japanese champions who fought the majority of their careers under muay Thai rules with unblemished ring records. In the case of Kunimatsu Okao, the referenced publicity likely intended only that Okao had been undefeated as champion. English-speaking publicists for these fights worked through interpreters, often without direct access to prime sources. Unintentional mistakes occurred. Urquidez did not commit those errors. 

 

Urquidez v Onuki

WIKIPEDIA excerpt - Retrieved 18 May 2011

Other Record Manipulations


On April 29, 1978, Urquidez faced his fourth Japanese opponent Shinobu Onuki; the event was co-promoted by the AJKF and Shin-Kakutojutsu Federation. ... Eventually, Urquidez completed a tactically dangerous and illegal shoulder throw, due, apparently, to his overwhelming frustration. The throw was effective and dislocated Onuki's shoulder. Initially, because of the throw, Urquidez was given a TKO loss, however, the promoters discovered that Urquidez used the throw without knowing it was illegal in Japan; the bout was then scored as a no-contest. ... However, Urquidez has since listed his first fight against Onuki as a TKO win.
Although Japanese rules for muay Thai competition outlawed throws because they interfered with clinch-fighting, throws had been contractually included in the international rules for this match. Both the disqualification and the initial no-contest rulings were improper. When the AJKBA (aka AJKF) merged with the WKA in late 1981, the WKA governing authority officially transmuted this outcome to a TKO. (See Urquidez record, STAR Finding *5)

Urquidez v Prayud (Prayout)

WIKIPEDIA excerpt - Retrieved 18 May 2011

Other Record Manipulations


On August 2, 1978, Urquidez faced the fifth-ranked welterweight Thai boxer, Prayout Sittiboonlert, as part of the Shin-Kakutojutsu Organization's first independent event. The rules for the bout included six two-minute rounds, one-minute intervals, and no elbow contact as per request made by Urquidez. Urquidez lost a heart-stopping decision to the Thai, who controlled the fight with relentless knee attacks and through the masterful use of Thai clinches... For years, Urquidez has claimed the Sittiboonlert fight was a no-contest, or has claimed the WKA and/or STAR system turned it into a no-contest. However, the fight was neither sanctioned nor promoted by the WKA. The fight was promoted by Kenji Kurosaki's Shin-Kakutojutsu Federation. Therefore, neither the WKA nor the STAR system had jurisdiction.

Clinch-fighting, which allows striking-and-holding, alters the competition. The STAR System regarded muay Thai as a different sport from kickboxing, like boxing or wrestling, and excluded this bout from its kickboxing ratings and record count. Notice that the above Wikipedia description of the fight, “with relentless knee attacks“ and “masterful use of Thai clinches,” confirms the STAR System’s classification of the bout as muay Thai. (See Urquidez record, STAR Finding *4)


The STAR System compilation of Urquidez’ record printed in the book King of the Ring (Pro Action Publishing, Los Angeles, 1995) was abridged from the authenticated STAR record and contains comments from a ghostwriter not affiliated with the STAR System. I do not accept responsibility for those comments. Review the complete STAR Authenticated Kickboxing Record for Benny Urquidez within this website. Neither the STAR System nor the WKA altered the New Combative Sports Federation (aka Shin-Kakutojutsu Federation) outcome for the bout: Urquidez lost a points-decision ... under muay Thai-style clinch-fighting rules, not international kickboxing. 

 

Instead, both STAR and WKA ignored this outcome as irrelevant to the rated competition within their purviews. At their core, the rules behind the two sports serve different purposes: Muay Thai seeks to preserve the traditions of Thailand’s ancient national sport while, also, increasing its appeal for gamblers through more unpredictable TKOs within the happenstance of knee and elbow blows. Kickboxing, in contrast, seeks to attract a mass television audience in the West through clean visual action, a minimum of blood, and a preponderance of athletic skill over happenstance.

 

Immediately after this event, it should be mentioned, the returning Americans insisted that the bout was supposed to be a no-decision bout (meaning knockout or draw; no judges) because Urquidez's scheduled opponent cancelled on short notice and, instead, Benny fought a middleweight nearly 20 pounds heavier. The promoter, the Americans believed, had intended to use this no-decision as an opportunity for political advantage within the Japanese kick-boxing community by first awarding a deceptively-achieved win to Prayout Srisontob (aka Prayud Sittiboonlert). The New Combative Sports Federation was disbanded in 1981 after a yakuza-scandal infested kick-boxing.


Cancelled Rematch

WIKIPEDIA excerpt - Retrieved 18 May 2011

Other Record Manipulations


Shocked, Urquidez vowed to avenge the loss, and a rematch was set on October 30, 1978 at the Budokon (Martial Arts Hall) as part of the five world championships card for the Shin-Kakutojutsu Organization. However, for unknown reasons, Urquidez canceled the fight on the day of the event. According to one report, Urquidez did travel to Japan, but was unable to recover sufficiently from a high fever which he contracted from an allergic reaction to pain medication being used to treat a lingering left knuckle injury.


At different stages in Urquidez’ career, there was also lots of talk about legendary dream matches against PKA World Champ Bill “Superfoot” Wallace, Japanese Muay Thai Champ Toshio Fujiwara and even a mix-match against WBA/WBC World Boxing Champ Roberto Duran. Certainly the champions were willing, but the fights never happened. Likewise, rematches for professional fighters are cancelled as often as they occur, usually owing to compensation or promotional obstacles. For example, the long-anticipated Urquidez rematch with WKA Welterweight World Champ Howard Jackson also never materialized. The above Wikipedia statement constitutes naive and innuendo-laden speculation that should have no place in an objective encyclopedia entry. 


Urquidez v Asuka

WIKIPEDIA excerpt - Retrieved 18 May 2011

Other Record Manipulations


After a six-year absence from the Japanese ring, Urquidez agreed to fight an exhibition against Nobuya Asuka on April 24, 1989 at the Tokyo Dome as part of the New Japan Pro-Wrestling event. The rules of the bout were five rounds at two-minutes each, one-minute intervals and without elbow or knee contact to the head. Additionally, it was established that, if the fight went the distance, it would automatically be scored as a draw. The bout did go five rounds without knockout or disqualification and a draw was immediately declared. However, Urquidez has neither listed the bout as an exhibition nor listed it as a draw. He has instead consistently listed the fight as a decision win.

The correct term for a competitive bout without judges that goes the distance is a no-decision.  In the West, no-decision contests have rarely been sanctioned since the early days of professional boxing.

 

When the Uquidez-Asuka bout occurred, the STAR System was preparing to cease operations and did not corroborate the reported outcome directly with Japanese sources. In the era preceding the Internet, verification from Japan required a burdensome procedure. We got this one wrong. This bout was a no-decision bout; the official outcome was a draw.  STAR accepts responsibility for reporting this one wrong. Urquidez does not control his STAR ring record. (See Urquidez record, STAR Finding *1)


Bottom Line

When Benny “The Jet” Urquidez reminisces about his remarkable championship career, if he misremembers, misstates or exaggerates at all, it’s not by very much.